February 19, 2019

Traditional Japanese Art: The Detail Oriented Painter

Eitoku_1

The two magnificent animals on this painting are Karajishi, lions of foreign land. Karajishi is one of the iconographic symbols of power in Japan that is believed to drive off evil spirits and represents strong authority and ability. Even though no one ever saw the real beast before arrival of the modern age, Japanese artists had been inspired by descriptions heard by the Chinese to create the mythological figure which looked like a mix of a dragon and a dog.

The artist who painted the painting on a large folding screen (7.3 x 14.8 ft.) is Eitoku Kano (1543–1590), one of the representative painters of Japan. He was born in Kyoto among the renowned Kano School of Painters, the longest lived and most authoritative school of art in Japanese history with approximately 400 years of prominence. Eitoku was a precociously gifted painter since his younger age and his bold brushwork and dynamic expression succeeded in attracting the most powerful patrons such as shogunate Nobunaga Oda and his successor Hideyoshi Toyotomi. These warlords struggled to restore unity over Japan after decades of constant warfare. As if making a show of their newly acquired power, they cherished robust and decorative style of art with gold opulently applied to them.

Eitoku_2

 

Eitoku_3
 

Throughout the centuries people have been captivated by Eitoku’s artwork not only by their vigor but also by his meticulous attention to detail.

In Rakuchu Rakugaizu (above), Eitoku painstakingly painted 2,479 men and women in close detail on a set of two screens (5.3 x 12.0 ft. each). They are a comprehensive visual image of Kyoto and of the lives of its townspeople. They portray manners and customs, business and entertainment, fashion and transportation, and lively atmosphere of the capital. Because of the graphic depiction of people and culture, these paintings provide exceptional value as historical research material as well.

Learn about other traditional Japanese artists: Traditional Japanese Art: The Floating World of Ukiyo-e.

ALSO IN BLOG

Traditional Japanese Art: The Detail Oriented Painter

February 19, 2019

Eitoku_1

The two magnificent animals on this painting are Karajishi, lions of foreign land. Karajishi is one of the iconographic symbols of power in Japan that is believed to drive off evil spirits and represents strong authority and ability. Even though no one ever saw the real beast before arrival of the modern age, Japanese artists had been inspired by descriptions heard by the Chinese to create the mythological figure which looked like a mix of a dragon and a dog.

READ MORE

A Look Into Etegami - Japanese Water Color Crafts

January 25, 2019

 Instructor Introduction Part 3 - Interview

In the previous two blog posts of “A Look Into Etegami - Japanese Water Color Crafts,” a brief description of Etegami and its Instructor Sachiko Hanashiro and her class activities were presented. In this Part 3, we are going to introduce some extracts from her interview on how Etegami has changed her life.

READ MORE

New Year, New Hobby? Try a Traditional Japanese Art

January 15, 2019

Everyone make New Year resolutions. Get that raise you deserve, spend more time with your family, stick to your diet and lose those last 10 pounds. Why not try something new for the new year and maybe start a life long hobby? Take the first step with one of our exciting traditional Japanese arts and crafts projects!

READ MORE

A Look Into Etegami - Japanese Water Color Crafts

December 21, 2018

Instructor Introduction Part 2 - Class Structure

In the previous blog post of “A Look Into Etegami - Japanese Water Color Crafts Instructor Introduction Part 1,” a brief description of Etegami and Instructor Sachiko Hanashiro were presented. In the Part 2, we are going to introduce her class activities.

READ MORE

Subscribe to our Newsletter!

Be the first to know for new arrivals and exclusive discounts.